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Notes on Women's Health
Notes on Women's Health

Category: Conditions and Treatments

STI Testing: What Will and What Won’t Show Up in Your Annual Well-Woman Exam

STI Testing Your annual well-woman examination from your OB-GYN is an assessment of your reproductive health as well as the condition of your genitourinary system (the reproductive system and the urinary organs), and for adult women under the age of 65, will routinely include a pelvic exam and Pap smear. Many women mistakenly think that a Pap smear checks for multiple sexually transmitted infections (STI), also known as sexually transmitted diseases (STD), but in reality, this is not the case. In fact, STI testing is not a standard part of an annual well-woman examination.

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Cervical Cancer and Pregnancy: Can you become pregnant after being diagnosed?

Cervical Cancer and PregnancyOver 11,000 American women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every year. The average age at diagnosis is in the early forties, so a significant portion of cervical cancer patients is still in their child-bearing years. Additionally, since many women are now waiting well into their thirties before becoming pregnant, fertility preservation has become a major concern for many who are facing cervical cancer.

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Ectopic Pregnancy Causes & How to Help Prevent It

Ectopic Pregnancy Causes An ectopic pregnancy is any pregnancy where the fertilized egg attaches and begins to grow outside of the uterus or womb. In a normal pregnancy, a fertilized egg develops into a fetus in the lining of the uterus. In an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg implants elsewhere within the female reproductive system. Over 95% of the time, an ectopic pregnancy implants in the fallopian tubes, the tubes that run from the ovaries to the uterus. However, in rare cases, an ectopic pregnancy may occur in the cervix, intra-abdominal area, or another location.

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FDA Approves First-Ever Postpartum Depression Drug

Postpartum Depression DrugLearn the Facts about Postpartum Depression and this New Medication

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that approximately 20 percent of new mothers are affected by some degree of postpartum depression. While treatments for postpartum depression have long been available, there has never been a drug specifically intended to address this potentially serious condition — until now. The approval of brexanolone (brand name Zulesso) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) represents a promising step forward for women suffering from postpartum depression and offers new hope for both them and their loved ones.

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What to Do Next After a Positive HPV Test Result

here's what to do after a positive HPV testHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is a widespread sexually-transmitted infection (STI). In fact, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that HPV is the most common STI in the United States, with nearly 80 million people infected. The virus is easily transmitted through sexual contact and occasionally may be transmitted without sexual contact.

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7 Critical Steps for Preventing Prenatal Infections During Pregnancy

Continue reading to learn how to prevent prenatal infectionsPregnant women and their unborn children are particularly vulnerable to many common infections. While these infections may not normally impact the general population, they are exceptionally dangerous for expectant mothers and can cause serious health problems. There are several steps you can take to prevent prenatal infections in both yourself and your baby. Here is a compendium of critical tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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Am I a Good Candidate for Gynecological da Vinci Surgery?

Am I a Good Candidate for Gynecological da Vinci Surgery?Years ago, patients who needed gynecological surgery only had a single option — an open procedure. In open procedures, the surgeon makes a large incision to carry out the operation resulting in the potential for greater postoperative pain, larger scars and longer recovery times. Today, laparoscopic surgery options have replaced that invasive procedure.

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HPV Vaccine: Facts to Consider for Your Preteen or Teen

The HPV VaccineIn the continuing fight to prevent cancer, there are known and unknown risk factors. For example, we know that certain environmental exposures increase the risk of developing some cancers, like lung and skin cancer. Research has also shown that family history sometimes plays a role in the risk of other cancers, such as colon and breast cancer. Studies have now demonstrated that there is a strong link between infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer.

There is currently no cure for HPV. Fortunately, a vaccine for many of the oncogenic – or cancer-causing – strains of HPV is available. Having your child vaccinated against HPV can significantly reduce their risk of developing several types of cancer, including cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, and throat. Additionally, the HPV vaccine can help guard against genital warts and warts in other locations. Read More