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Notes on Women's Health
Notes on Women's Health

Category: Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Am I a Good Candidate for Gynecological da Vinci Surgery?

Am I a Good Candidate for Gynecological da Vinci Surgery?Years ago, patients who needed gynecological surgery only had a single option — an open procedure. In open procedures, the surgeon makes a large incision to carry out the operation resulting in the potential for greater postoperative pain, larger scars and longer recovery times. Today, laparoscopic surgery options have replaced that invasive procedure.

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Robotic Surgery as a Solution

Join me on Thursday, October 27 at 7:30 pm at Norwalk Hospital for a free educational seminar to discusss Minimally Invasive Surgery for the treatment of Pelvic Prolapse, Uterine Fibroids and Endometriosis.  To register call 1-866-NHB-WELL.

Clinical study finds advantages to laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy as a pelvic organ prolapse treatment

Those of you who have followed my blogs for a while know that I’ve written about pelvic prolapse a few times — once about daVinci surgery and another time regarding a clinical study that was set up to see if synthetic mesh inserted through a vaginal incision is beneficial in the repair of pelvic organ prolapse. Pelvic organ prolapse is a relatively common condition caused by the weakening of pelvic muscles and ligaments that support organs such as the bladder and uterus. When this weakening occurs, these organs can slip out of place, often pushing into or through the vagina. Pelvic organ prolapse can be uncomfortable and it can interfere with bowel movements, urination and sexual activity.

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Choosing a Treatment for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Back in April I blogged about pelvic organ prolapse. It’s a relatively common condition caused by the weakening of pelvic muscles and ligaments that support organs such as the bladder and uterus. When this weakening occurs, these organs can slip out of place, often pushing into or through the vagina. Pelvic organ prolapse can be uncomfortable and it can interfere with urination, bowel movements and sexual activity.

I’m writing about pelvic organ prolapse again because of a recent clinical study that was set up to see if synthetic mesh inserted through a vaginal incision is beneficial in the repair of pelvic organ prolapse. This surgical procedure, called vaginal colpopexy, has been performed using sutures for many years with success rates in the neighborhood of 65-75%. These failure rates are much higher than the failure rate with da Vinci sacrocolpopexy, which I wrote about in my April blog.

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da Vinci surgery, pelvic organ prolapse and sacrocolpopexy

Along with uterine fibroids, which I discussed in my last blog, one of the conditions I treat pretty regularly is pelvic organ prolapse. This is a relatively common condition, affecting more than a third of all women at some point in their lives. It can occur in women of all ages, but it’s more common as women get older. It’s also more common among women who have had a difficult labor or recent abdominal surgery such as a hysterectomy. Smoking, obesity, respiratory disorders and repetitive strain injuries can all make pelvic organ prolapse more likely.

Prolapse literally means “to fall out of place”. When pelvic organ prolapse occurs, organs such as the uterus or bladder fall down or slip out of place, often pushing into or through the vagina. Pelvic organ prolapse can be uncomfortable and it can interfere with urination, bowel movements and sexual activity.

Going back just a decade or so, the most common treatment options for serious pelvic organ prolapse cases were relatively limited. Reconstructive surgery was one option, and hysterectomy was another. Today, an increasingly common option is called sacrocolpopexy. Read More

da Vinci surgery: your questions answered

As one of the first doctors in Fairfield County, Connecticut to be certified in da Vinci surgery, I’m asked a lot of questions about the technology and how it can be used to treat endometriosis, uterine fibroids, pelvic organ prolapse and other conditions. Since I’ve seen so much interest and heard so many questions about da Vinci surgery, I thought it would be helpful to use this blog to provide information to women who may be considering or facing surgery.

In the next few weeks, I’ll be posting a series of blogs about da Vinci surgery and how I use it in my own medical practice. If you have any experiences you’d like to share, please feel free to comment. Read More