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Notes on Women's Health
Notes on Women's Health

Category: In the News

COVID-19 and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know

COVID-19 and PregnancyThe current global outbreak of COVID-19, commonly called coronavirus, is an issue of great concern for the general population, especially those who are pregnant, elderly or those who have serious chronic medical conditions.

After the 2015 outbreak of the Zika virus, which can be transmissible from mother to fetus and cause microcephaly and other fetal brain defects, it is reasonable to wonder what additional risks coronavirus may pose to pregnant women. Here is what you need to know about the COVID-19 coronavirus and pregnancy. 

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New Information on the Link Between Talcum Powder and Ovarian Cancer

Link Between Talcum Powder and Ovarian CancerTalcum powder is a powdered form of the mineral talc, valued for its ability to absorb moisture and reduce friction. This makes it a common ingredient in many household cosmetic and hygiene products like baby powder, adult face and body powder, and deodorizing powders. While the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel considers talc safe enough for human use, it has faced controversy and concerns over its safety in recent years.

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What is the Link Between Age and Breast Cancer Risk?

Age and Breast Cancer Risk Multiple risk factors can influence a woman’s chance of developing breast cancer during her lifetime. While many of these risk factors are controllable, such as being overweight after menopause, being physically inactive and drinking alcohol, other risk factors, like age, are beyond a woman’s control. This is not to say that every woman will develop breast cancer as she advances in age. However, the risk of breast cancer does increase with age.

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How to Sleep When Pregnant: An Update

How to sleep when pregnant - Norwalk, CTExpectant mothers have been advised for years that sleeping on the left side of their body during pregnancy is best for the baby. Sleeping on the back, called the supine position, was particularly discouraged. Failure to follow this recommendation came with warnings of increased risk of stillbirth, underweight newborns, and gestational hypertension in the mother.

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How to Prevent Preeclampsia in Pregnant Women with Aspirin

How to Prevent Preeclampsia in Pregnant Women with AspirinHypertension, or high blood pressure, can be a health risk for anyone. However, this condition is particularly dangerous for pregnant women and their unborn children. There is an even greater danger if gestational hypertension becomes a condition called preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is defined as maternal high blood pressure during pregnancy accompanied by signs of organ damage. Not only is preeclampsia a chief cause of preterm births, but this problem can eventually progress to eclampsia, which often results in seizures, coma, and even death.

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Are You Dense? The Link between Breast Density and Breast Cancer

The Link between Breast Density and Breast CancerThere are several important breast cancer risk factors among women, such as age, family history of breast cancer and reproductive history, but breast density is one risk factor that has not received extensive attention from the media. In this article, I explain breast density, how to find out if you have dense breasts, and what breast density means for your health.

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FDA Approves First-Ever Postpartum Depression Drug

Postpartum Depression DrugLearn the Facts about Postpartum Depression and this New Medication

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that approximately 20 percent of new mothers are affected by some degree of postpartum depression. While treatments for postpartum depression have long been available, there has never been a drug specifically intended to address this potentially serious condition — until now. The approval of brexanolone (brand name Zulesso) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) represents a promising step forward for women suffering from postpartum depression and offers new hope for both them and their loved ones.

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The ARRIVE Clinical Trial: New evidence supports the safety of elective labor induction at 39 weeks

Pregnant woman counting down days until laborThe normal human gestation period is nine months or 40 weeks. Of course, real life is rarely textbook perfect, and most women do not go into spontaneous labor at exactly 40 weeks, 0 days of pregnancy. The majority of babies arrive a few days before or after this mark, and this mild unpunctuality is usually not a cause for concern.

As of 2009, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) reported that almost one-quarter (22%) of all pregnant women in the United States underwent induction of labor. This figure had more than doubled since 1990. Of course, many women have inductions for medically-indicated reasons, but elective inductions are also popular for reasons of convenience or to choose their child’s birth date. Read More

Connecticut OBGYN Dr. John Garofalo is Awarded AlUM Ultrasound Practice Accreditation

AIUM ultrasound The Ultrasound Practice Accreditation Council of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) is pleased to announce that Dr. John Garofalo has been awarded ultrasound practice accreditation in the areas of Adjunct Competence in 3D (GYN); Gynecologic; Obstetric (First Trimester); Obstetric (Second Trimester); and Obstetric (Third Trimester).

Dr. Garofalo achieved this recognition by meeting rigorous voluntary guidelines set by the diagnostic ultrasound profession. All facets of the practice were assessed, including the training and qualifications of physicians and sonographers; ultrasound equipment maintenance; documentation; storage, and record-keeping practices; policies and procedures to protect patients and staff; quality assurance methods; and the thoroughness, technical quality and interpretation of the sonograms the practice performs. Read More

Low Libido in Women: What to Do When Your Sex Drive Fades

low libido in womenLow libido: a fact of life for many women

If you’re experiencing low libido, fear not … you’re not alone! In a recent U.S. study of more than 2,000 women between the ages of 30 and 70, more than a third had low sexual desire. It’s one of the most common concerns we hear from our patients. And it’s no wonder: As women navigate their middle years, they often find themselves deep into a long-term relationship, a career, raising teens, and taking care of aging relatives.

All of these situations can cause stress, which can have a negative effect on your sex life. And that’s just for starters. Read More