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Notes on Women's Health
Notes on Women's Health

Category: Pregnancy Care

Ectopic Pregnancy Causes & How to Help Prevent It

Ectopic Pregnancy Causes An ectopic pregnancy is any pregnancy where the fertilized egg attaches and begins to grow outside of the uterus or womb. In a normal pregnancy, a fertilized egg develops into a fetus in the lining of the uterus. In an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg implants elsewhere within the female reproductive system. Over 95% of the time, an ectopic pregnancy implants in the fallopian tubes, the tubes that run from the ovaries to the uterus. However, in rare cases, an ectopic pregnancy may occur in the cervix, intra-abdominal area, or another location.

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FDA Approves First-Ever Postpartum Depression Drug

Postpartum Depression DrugLearn the Facts about Postpartum Depression and this New Medication

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that approximately 20 percent of new mothers are affected by some degree of postpartum depression. While treatments for postpartum depression have long been available, there has never been a drug specifically intended to address this potentially serious condition — until now. The approval of brexanolone (brand name Zulesso) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) represents a promising step forward for women suffering from postpartum depression and offers new hope for both them and their loved ones.

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Amenorrhea in Women: 6 Facts You Should Know

Amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation of one or more menstrual periods. A woman is considered to have amenorrhea if she has missed at least three periods in a row or if she has not received their first menstrual cycle yet. In other words, amenorrhea is the term for when you do not have periods. Here are six facts about this condition, including possible causes.

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7 Critical Steps for Preventing Prenatal Infections During Pregnancy

Continue reading to learn how to prevent prenatal infectionsPregnant women and their unborn children are particularly vulnerable to many common infections. While these infections may not normally impact the general population, they are exceptionally dangerous for expectant mothers and can cause serious health problems. There are several steps you can take to prevent prenatal infections in both yourself and your baby. Here is a compendium of critical tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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We Answer The Top 8 Women’s Reproductive Questions

Let Dr. Garofalo answer your top reproductive questionsAsk any doctor and they’ll tell you… One of the most important parts of their job is to answer patients’ questions accurately and thoroughly. By providing this education, we can develop a stronger patient-provider relationship and empower women to make the most informed health decisions possible. Answering reproductive questions daily in our Connecticut office, we think it’s helpful to share the most common questions about women’s health, specifically those concerning female reproduction, as well as our answers.

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4 Reasons to Get a Flu Shot If You’re Pregnant

Should I get a flu shot while pregnant?Annual flu shots are an easily-accessible and preventative measure for almost everyone. The flu is much more than simply a bad cold. Although both the common cold and the flu may cause upper respiratory symptoms, influenza can be serious and even fatal. As reported by CBS News, around 80,000 Americans died from the flu and related complications during the winter of 2017/2018. The flu leaves patients open to other life-threatening infections like pneumonia. It is especially crucial that high-risk groups be vaccinated against the flu every year. These groups include the elderly, young children, and pregnant women.

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Looking for an OB-GYN in Connecticut? Here are Six Considerations

OB-GYN in ConnecticutChoosing any healthcare provider is an important decision and one that requires some basic research. When searching for an OB-GYN in Connecticut, there are several factors to consider during your exploration that can impact your final selection, and ultimately, help you find the right fit for your long-term women’s healthcare needs. While you may also have priorities of your own in mind, these six considerations can help get you started on your search.

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The ARRIVE Clinical Trial: New evidence supports the safety of elective labor induction at 39 weeks

Pregnant woman counting down days until laborThe normal human gestation period is nine months or 40 weeks. Of course, real life is rarely textbook perfect, and most women do not go into spontaneous labor at exactly 40 weeks, 0 days of pregnancy. The majority of babies arrive a few days before or after this mark, and this mild unpunctuality is usually not a cause for concern.

As of 2009, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) reported that almost one-quarter (22%) of all pregnant women in the United States underwent induction of labor. This figure had more than doubled since 1990. Of course, many women have inductions for medically-indicated reasons, but elective inductions are also popular for reasons of convenience or to choose their child’s birth date. Read More

What Determines a Pregnancy High-Risk and What Can You Expect?

Pregnant woman with husbandMany women are concerned about health risks during pregnancy that may affect both themselves and their child. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a high-risk pregnancy is “one that threatens the health or life of the mother or her fetus.” But what are these risk factors, and how do you know if your pregnancy is high-risk? And if your pregnancy is high-risk, how will your prenatal course differ from a “normal” pregnancy? We will answer these questions below and provide some general advice for women during a high-risk pregnancy.

What Makes a Pregnancy High-Risk?

There are hundreds of factors that could raise the risk of any pregnancy. These factors can be broadly separated into controllable and uncontrollable categories. Controllable risk factors include problems like smoking or other substance abuse, obesity and poor diet. Examples of uncontrollable risk factors are maternal age, family medical history, preexisting diseases like diabetes or cardiovascular disease, and infections such as HIV. Read More

6 Reasons a Cesarean (C-Section) May be Necessary

Baby feet with pink ribbonA Cesarean section, more commonly known as a C-section, is a method of delivery that involves making an incision through a woman’s lower abdomen and into her uterus to deliver the infant. C-sections are very common. In fact, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that 31.9% of all recorded US births in 2016 were by C-section. This figure means that roughly one in three deliveries occurred via C-section.

When a C-Section May be Medically Necessary

Worldwide C-sections have saved the lives and preserved the health of hundreds of thousands of babies and mothers when they are medically necessary. Following our instances where a c-section may be required: Read More