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Notes on Women's Health
Notes on Women's Health

Category: Well Women Care

Amenorrhea in Women: 6 Facts You Should Know

Amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation of one or more menstrual periods. A woman is considered to have amenorrhea if she has missed at least three periods in a row or if she has not received their first menstrual cycle yet. In other words, amenorrhea is the term for when you do not have periods. Here are six facts about this condition, including possible causes.

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What to Do Next After a Positive HPV Test Result

here's what to do after a positive HPV testHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is a widespread sexually-transmitted infection (STI). In fact, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that HPV is the most common STI in the United States, with nearly 80 million people infected. The virus is easily transmitted through sexual contact and occasionally may be transmitted without sexual contact.

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Looking for an OB-GYN in Connecticut? Here are Six Considerations

OB-GYN in ConnecticutChoosing any healthcare provider is an important decision and one that requires some basic research. When searching for an OB-GYN in Connecticut, there are several factors to consider during your exploration that can impact your final selection, and ultimately, help you find the right fit for your long-term women’s healthcare needs. While you may also have priorities of your own in mind, these six considerations can help get you started on your search.

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The End of Essure as a Permanent Birth Control Option: What You Need to Know

Patient speaking with doctor about birth control and EssureA look back at Essure

It’s been almost 16 years since the Food and Drug Administration approved Essure in late 2002. Back then, Essure was created as an alternative to tubal ligation, a surgical procedure in which a woman’s “tubes are tied” — or, more accurately, clamped and sealed, resulting in sterilization and permanent birth control.

How does Essure work?

Essure implants consist of two tiny, implantable metal coils that are inserted into the fallopian tubes — a pair of tubes along which eggs travel from the ovaries to the uterus. Once inside the fallopian tubes, Essure implants cause scar tissue to gradually form, eventually blocking the tubes and preventing fertilization of a woman’s eggs. While tubal ligation is considered major surgery that requires local, general or spinal anesthesia, Essure involves a simpler procedure that can be done in a doctor’s office, with less anesthesia required.

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Aging, Fertility and a Woman’s Biological Clock

Pregnant woman on bed American women are having babies later in life. The last few decades have seen the average age at which women have their first child gradually rise, and this trend has been particularly notable since 2016. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics, more women are first becoming mothers in their thirties rather than their twenties. This is the first time this phenomenon has been observed in American history. Furthermore, the only segment of the population to see an overall increase in birth rates since 2016 is women over 40.

A combination of factors is likely driving this shift in average maternal age. Now that women have access to a plethora of educational opportunities and occupations, many choose to firmly establish their careers before having children. Additionally, advances in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and other fertility treatments mean that older women are now more likely to have successful pregnancies than in the past. So, is there still such a thing as the biological clock for women today? Read More

Menstruation and Hormones: What You Need to Know About Your Monthly Cycle

OBGYN Doctor reviewing Menstruation and HormonesA woman begins her menstrual cycle at the onset of puberty (menarche), and this cycle more or less continues, occasionally interrupted by pregnancy or illness, until menopause. You probably already know that the menstrual cycle functions as a fertility mechanism, playing a huge role in ovulation and possible pregnancy. What you may not realize is that your menstrual cycle is also closely linked with your sex hormones.

In fact, these hormones control almost every physical aspect of your menstrual cycle – from the buildup of your uterine lining to release of an egg during ovulation. Additionally, your sex hormones can have a profound effect on your mood. Feelings of sadness, crankiness, or even elation during your monthly cycle are not caused solely by physical sensations like cramps and bloating. These emotions can also be caused by a change in hormone levels. Read More

HPV Vaccine: Facts to Consider for Your Preteen or Teen

The HPV VaccineIn the continuing fight to prevent cancer, there are known and unknown risk factors. For example, we know that certain environmental exposures increase the risk of developing some cancers, like lung and skin cancer. Research has also shown that family history sometimes plays a role in the risk of other cancers, such as colon and breast cancer. Studies have now demonstrated that there is a strong link between infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer.

There is currently no cure for HPV. Fortunately, a vaccine for many of the oncogenic – or cancer-causing – strains of HPV is available. Having your child vaccinated against HPV can significantly reduce their risk of developing several types of cancer, including cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, and throat. Additionally, the HPV vaccine can help guard against genital warts and warts in other locations. Read More

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): What You Can Do for PMS Relief

Woman wanting PMS ReliefWe hear it all the time: “My husband doesn’t know who I am,” “I can’t stop yelling at the kids,” “I’m crying all the time,” and “After I get my period, everything’s better.” Almost every woman will experience PMS symptoms in her life. About 70% of women will suffer from headaches, mood swings, bloating and other problems that can affect their relationships and sense of wellbeing. And in about 20% of these women, the symptoms are severe enough to require medical treatment. So if you found your way to this blog in search of PMS relief, you’re not alone.

But what’s a woman to do during those difficult days every month? Read More

Are Tampons Safe? Toxic Shock Syndrome from Tampons: Questions and Answers

are tampons safeWhat is toxic shock syndrome?

Recently, InStyle Magazine ran an article about a model named Lauren Wasser who lost her right leg and the toes on her left foot after contracting toxic shock syndrome, a dangerous but rare condition that can occur with certain types of bacterial infections. In most cases, people with toxic shock syndrome have to be hospitalized and closely monitored. If it’s untreated, toxic shock syndrome can lead to shock, kidney failure and even death, leaving many women wondering, “are tampons safe?”

Lauren Wasser has been busy lately, with a return to modeling and also acting in a TV series called Loudermilk. She even created a TED Talk to describe her ordeal. She has an inspiring story to tell, and part of her story is to warn women and girls about potential risks associated with tampons. Read More