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Notes on Women's Health
Notes on Women's Health

Tag: gynecologist

Weight Loss After Pregnancy: Staying Healthy as You Get Your Body Back

weight loss after pregnancyIt seems like you only need to go as far as the nearest supermarket checkout line to see photos of celebrity moms flaunting their amazing post-pregnancy figures – a few months or even weeks after giving birth. One week it’s Blake Lively, the next week it’s Mila Kunis, giving the impression that managing weight loss after pregnancy is a cinch.

But while speedy celebrity transformations are certainly impressive, are they healthy? What are the effects of rapid weight loss on the new mother – and, indirectly, the new child?

What are the best ways to manage weight loss after pregnancy? These are questions we hear regularly at our practice … and here are a few answers. Read More

In the News: AAP Recommends LARCs for Sexually Active Adolescents

garOctober 30, 2014 – Earlier this month, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended that the first-line contraceptive choice for sexually active adolescents is a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC). This is a new recommendation for the APP, which is an organization of 62,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults. Read More

Choosing a Treatment for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Back in April I blogged about pelvic organ prolapse. It’s a relatively common condition caused by the weakening of pelvic muscles and ligaments that support organs such as the bladder and uterus. When this weakening occurs, these organs can slip out of place, often pushing into or through the vagina. Pelvic organ prolapse can be uncomfortable and it can interfere with urination, bowel movements and sexual activity.

I’m writing about pelvic organ prolapse again because of a recent clinical study that was set up to see if synthetic mesh inserted through a vaginal incision is beneficial in the repair of pelvic organ prolapse. This surgical procedure, called vaginal colpopexy, has been performed using sutures for many years with success rates in the neighborhood of 65-75%. These failure rates are much higher than the failure rate with da Vinci sacrocolpopexy, which I wrote about in my April blog.

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Essure Permanent Birth Control: Questions and Answers

(PART 1)

Lately I’ve been getting a lot of questions from my patients about the Essure birth control procedure. Maybe it’s because of the recent publicity from Olympic gold medalist Picabo Street, who announced earlier this year that she’d undergone the procedure. In any case, I thought I’d answer some of the most common questions I’ve heard. I’ve also included some useful links at the bottom of this blog. Read More

da Vinci Surgery and Hysterectomy

In my last blog, I mentioned that da Vinci surgery provides precision that’s crucial when working in close proximity to delicate organs like the bladder. In addition, the camera technology provides a great deal of detail. If you’re facing the prospect of surgery and you think of the kind of surgery you’d prefer to have, hopefully words like detail and precision are ones that come to mind.

This combination of detail and precision makes da Vinci very well suited for a variety of surgery types and procedures, including several that I do regularly as part of my medical practice. For this blog I thought I’d talk about da Vinci surgery and hysterectomy. Read More

What is da Vinci surgery?

Leonardo da Vinci

As I mentioned in my last blog, the da Vinci Surgical System uses a computerized interface between the surgeon and the instruments to conduct surgical procedures. The name “da Vinci” was chosen for the system because legendary artist and inventor Leonardo da Vinci is credited with designing the first robot. It’s also a fitting name because Leonardo da Vinci used anatomical accuracy and three-dimensional details to lend realism to his art.

For many people, the use of robots or robotic tools in surgery raises some concerns. One commonly accepted definition of a robot is “an automatically guided machine, able to do tasks on its own.” This definition is a bit vague, but experts generally agree that robots tend to do some or all of the following: move around, operate a mechanical limb, sense and manipulate their environment, and exhibit intelligent behavior, especially behavior which mimics humans or other animals.

Given only those definitions to describe da Vinci technology, I’d be concerned too. To be honest, I’ve avoided using the word “robot” or “robotic” to describe the da Vinci Surgical System in my website. It’s not really an accurate term, since the da Vinci system is directed and controlled by a human being Read More